Another gun-fighter speech by President Obama…

Duel At Diablo5

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The President’s Afterword

on the defeat of the common-sense gun regulation bill in the U.S. Senate

April 17, 2013

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A few months ago, in response to too many tragedies — including the shootings of a United States Congresswoman, Gabby Giffords, who’s here today, and the murder of 20 innocent schoolchildren and their teachers –- this country took up the cause of protecting more of our people from gun violence.

Families that know unspeakable grief summoned the courage to petition their elected leaders –- not just to honor the memory of their children, but to protect the lives of all our children. And a few minutes ago, a minority in the United States Senate decided it wasn’t worth it. They blocked common-sense gun reforms even while these families looked on from the Senate gallery.

By now, it’s well known that 90 percent of the American people support universal background checks that make it harder for a dangerous person to buy a gun. We’re talking about convicted felons, people convicted of domestic violence, people with a severe mental illness. Ninety percent of Americans support that idea. Most Americans think that’s already the law.

And a few minutes ago, 90 percent of Democrats in the Senate just voted for that idea. But it’s not going to happen because 90 percent of Republicans in the Senate just voted against that idea.

A majority of senators voted “yes” to protecting more of our citizens with smarter background checks. But by this continuing distortion of Senate rules, a minority was able to block it from moving forward.

I’m going to speak plainly and honestly about what’s happened here because the American people are trying to figure out how can something have 90 percent support and yet not happen. We had a Democrat and a Republican -– both gun owners, both fierce defenders of our Second Amendment, with “A” grades from the NRA — come together and worked together to write a common-sense compromise on background checks. And I want to thank Joe Manchin and Pat Toomey for their courage in doing that. That was not easy given their traditional strong support for Second Amendment rights.

As they said, nobody could honestly claim that the package they put together infringed on our Second Amendment rights. All it did was extend the same background check rules that already apply to guns purchased from a dealer to guns purchased at gun shows or over the Internet. So 60 percent of guns are already purchased through a background check system; this would have covered a lot of the guns that are currently outside that system.

Their legislation showed respect for gun owners, and it showed respect for the victims of gun violence. And Gabby Giffords, by the way, is both — she’s a gun owner and a victim of gun violence. She is a Westerner and a moderate. And she supports these background checks.

In fact, even the NRA used to support expanded background checks. The current leader of the NRA used to support these background checks. So while this compromise didn’t contain everything I wanted or everything that these families wanted, it did represent progress. It represented moderation and common sense. That’s why 90 percent of the American people supported it.

But instead of supporting this compromise, the gun lobby and its allies willfully lied about the bill. They claimed that it would create some sort of “big brother” gun registry, even though the bill did the opposite. This legislation, in fact, outlawed any registry. Plain and simple, right there in the text. But that didn’t matter.

And unfortunately, this pattern of spreading untruths about this legislation served a purpose, because those lies upset an intense minority of gun owners, and that in turn intimidated a lot of senators. And I talked to several of these senators over the past few weeks, and they’re all good people. I know all of them were shocked by tragedies like Newtown. And I also understand that they come from states that are strongly pro-gun. And I have consistently said that there are regional differences when it comes to guns, and that both sides have to listen to each other.

But the fact is most of these senators could not offer any good reason why we wouldn’t want to make it harder for criminals and those with severe mental illnesses to buy a gun. There were no coherent arguments as to why we wouldn’t do this. It came down to politics — the worry that that vocal minority of gun owners would come after them in future elections. They worried that the gun lobby would spend a lot of money and paint them as anti-Second Amendment.

And obviously, a lot of Republicans had that fear, but Democrats had that fear, too. And so they caved to the pressure, and they started looking for an excuse — any excuse — to vote “no.”

One common argument I heard was that this legislation wouldn’t prevent all future massacres. And that’s true. As I said from the start, no single piece of legislation can stop every act of violence and evil. We learned that tragically just two days ago. But if action by Congress could have saved one person, one child, a few hundred, a few thousand — if it could have prevented those people from losing their lives to gun violence in the future while preserving our Second Amendment rights, we had an obligation to try.

And this legislation met that test. And too many senators failed theirs.

I’ve heard some say that blocking this step would be a victory. And my question is, a victory for who? A victory for what? All that happened today was the preservation of the loophole that lets dangerous criminals buy guns without a background check. That didn’t make our kids safer. Victory for not doing something that 90 percent of Americans, 80 percent of Republicans, the vast majority of your constituents wanted to get done? It begs the question, who are we here to represent?

I’ve heard folks say that having the families of victims lobby for this legislation was somehow misplaced. “A prop,” somebody called them. “Emotional blackmail,” some outlet said. Are they serious? Do we really think that thousands of families whose lives have been shattered by gun violence don’t have a right to weigh in on this issue? Do we think their emotions, their loss is not relevant to this debate?

So all in all, this was a pretty shameful day for Washington.

But this effort is not over. I want to make it clear to the American people we can still bring about meaningful changes that reduce gun violence, so long as the American people don’t give up on it. Even without Congress, my administration will keep doing everything it can to protect more of our communities. We’re going to address the barriers that prevent states from participating in the existing background check system. We’re going to give law enforcement more information about lost and stolen guns so it can do its job. We’re going to help to put in place emergency plans to protect our children in their schools.

But we can do more if Congress gets its act together. And if this Congress refuses to listen to the American people and pass common-sense gun legislation, then the real impact is going to have to come from the voters.

To all the people who supported this legislation — law enforcement and responsible gun owners, Democrats and Republicans, urban moms, rural hunters, whoever you are — you need to let your representatives in Congress know that you are disappointed, and that if they don’t act this time, you will remember come election time.

To the wide majority of NRA households who supported this legislation, you need to let your leadership and lobbyists in Washington know they didn’t represent your views on this one.

The point is those who care deeply about preventing more and more gun violence will have to be as passionate, and as organized, and as vocal as those who blocked these common-sense steps to help keep our kids safe. Ultimately, you outnumber those who argued the other way. But they’re better organized. They’re better financed. They’ve been at it longer. And they make sure to stay focused on this one issue during election time. And that’s the reason why you can’t have something that 90 percent of Americans support and you can’t get it through the Senate or the House of Representatives.

So to change Washington, you, the American people, are going to have to sustain some passion about this. And when necessary, you’ve got to send the right people to Washington. And that requires strength, and it requires persistence.

And that’s the one thing that these families should have inspired in all of us. I still don’t know how they have been able to muster up the strength to do what they’ve been doing over the last several weeks, last several months.

And I see this as just round one. When Newtown happened, I met with these families and I spoke to the community, and I said, something must be different right now. We’re going to have to change. That’s what the whole country said. Everybody talked about how we were going to change something to make sure this didn’t happen again, just like everybody talked about how we needed to do something after Aurora. Everybody talked about we needed to change something after Tucson.

And I’m assuming that the emotions that we’ve all felt since Newtown, the emotions that we’ve all felt since Tucson and Aurora and Chicago — the pain we share with these families and families all across the country who’ve lost a loved one to gun violence — I’m assuming that’s not a temporary thing. I’m assuming our expressions of grief and our commitment to do something different to prevent these things from happening are not empty words.

I believe we’re going to be able to get this done. Sooner or later, we are going to get this right. The memories of these children demand it. And so do the American people.

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Photo: “Duel at Diablo” 1966

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Tied-up by the Tea Party bunch…

hostage!

U.S. President Barack Obama and the American People are held hostage in the basement of the House of Representatives by The Tea Party bunch.  This gang of extreme right-wing congressional thugs are out to weaken your economy and your government so that the filthy rich can get filthier & richer without closing tax loopholes.  Meantime a very important deadline day-by-day looms closer…  Tighten your cinches, America!

Checkmate

Duel at Diablo 1966

President Barack Obama and a school resource officer disarm Senator John McCain because, according to a recent background check, he is insane…

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GUN 2013

Chapter 3

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I am only minute chaff a-dangle on the edge of a scratch on the omniscient chessboard.  Squirrel meat & berries, in the end, could be my only subsistance.  Death comes.  Veil pierced.  What’s next?  A power-that-be moves another piece and the game continues, always a-dangle on the edge of its own catastrophic consequences.

Iran wants nuclear capabilities ~ or the bomb.  We’ve got ’em weakly surrounded with weak democracies recently forged ~ Iraq, Afghanistan.  I don’t have a map to consult right now.  But that’s the geopolitical current event.

Exit Bush Jr.  Enter Obama.  Some call it weak.  Others call it peace.  Never the less, a pawn or maybe a rook moves.  Smite the Republicans.  Pummel the Democrats.  Check.

Presently, the war mongers won’t let the recently re-elected president have his reasonable compatible (for him not them) defense secretary.  They want another berserk bozo in there, instead, to match their own idiocy.  The powers-that-be moan and groan and I am one minute chunk of chaff a-dangle.  But I am also the White House’s favorite secret agent.  Maybe you are too.  It’s a matter of choice.

Checkmate.

I have received an urgent e-mail from President Barack Obama.  He wants me to write my senator.  He wants me to sway the congressman or woman up another trail ~ common-sense gun regulation.  The president is tired of seeing innocent American children splattered by idiots wielding cherished assault weapons.  I’m tired of seeing this too.  It just ain’t right.  Assault weapons were originally designed for war.  Now every wanna-be cowboy in Texas has one ~ or collects them like match-box toys.

I’ll write my senator alright.  And I’m gonna discuss the dilemma of Chuck Hagel, the wanna-be defense secretary, too, in the letter.

God bless the children.

~ from Rawclyde!

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Photo: Sidney Poitier & James Garner in Duel At Diablo (1966)

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It’s time to do something…

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Sidney Poitier “Duel At Diablo” 1966

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REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT ON PREVENTING GUN VIOLENCE

Minneapolis, Minnesota, February 4, 2013

(full text)

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PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA:  Hello, everybody. Please have a seat. Have a seat.

Well, it is good to be back in Minnesota. (Applause.) It is good to be back. Although I was commenting that they don’t really have winter in Washington, D.C. (Laughter.) So I’ve gotten soft over these last four years. When I was in Chicago, this was nothing. Now it’s something. (Laughter.) But I’m grateful for all of you being here today. I want to thank Chief Harteau and the entire Minneapolis Police Department for having me here today.

There are a number of other people that I just want to acknowledge here. First of all, a wonderful man and one of America’s greatest public servants is here — Walter Mondale, former Vice President. (Applause.) Your outstanding Governor, Mark Dayton, is here. (Applause.) Two great Mayors — Mayor R.T. Rybak of Minneapolis, and Mayor Chris Coleman of St. Paul. (Applause.) And your outstanding congressional delegation — Senator Amy Klobuchar — (applause) — Senator Al Franken — (applause) — Representative Keith Ellison — (applause) — and Representative Betty McCullough. (Applause.)

And I should acknowledge my outstanding Attorney General — what’s your name again? (Laughter.) He does a great job every single day, and I could not be prouder of Eric Holder for his leadership on this issue in particular. (Applause.)

Now, I just had a chance to sit down with some local police officers but also community leaders, as well as folks who themselves had been victims or whose families had been victims of gun violence, to hear their ideas about how we can protect our kids and address the broader epidemic of gun violence in this country. Because if we’re serious about preventing the kinds of tragedies that happened in Newtown, or the tragedies that happen every day in places like Chicago or Philadelphia or Minneapolis, then law enforcement and other community leaders must have a seat at the table.

All the folks standing here behind me today, they’re the ones on the front line of this fight. They see the awful consequences — the lives lost, the families shattered. They know what works, they know what doesn’t work, and they know how to get things done without regard for politics.

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So we’ve had a very productive discussion. And one of the things that struck me was that even though those who were sitting around that table represented very different communities, from big cities to small towns, they all believe it’s time to take some basic, common-sense steps to reduce gun violence. We may not be able to prevent every massacre or random shooting. No law or set of laws can keep our children completely safe. But if there’s even one thing we can do, if there’s just one life we can save, we’ve got an obligation to try.

That’s been the philosophy here in Minneapolis. A few years back, you suffered a spike in violent crime involving young people. So this city came together. You launched a series of youth initiatives that have reduced the number of young people injured by guns by 40 percent — 40 percent. So when it comes to protecting our children from gun violence, you’ve shown that progress is possible. We’ve still got to deal with the 60 percent that remains, but that 40 percent means lives saved — parents whose hearts aren’t broken, communities that aren’t terrorized and afraid.

We don’t have to agree on everything to agree it’s time to do something. (Applause.) That’s my main message here today.

And each of us has a role to play. A few weeks ago, I took action on my own to strengthen background checks, to help schools get more resource officers if they want them, and to direct the Centers for Disease Control to study the causes of violence. Because for a long time, even looking at the evidence was considered somehow tough politics. And so Congress had taken the approach that, we don’t want to know. Well, that’s never the answer to a problem — is not wanting to know what is going on.

So we’ve been able to take some steps through administrative action. But while these steps are important, real and lasting change also requires Congress to do its part and to do it soon, not to wait. The good news is that we’re starting to see a consensus emerge about the action Congress needs to take.

The vast majority of Americans — including a majority of gun owners — support requiring criminal background checks for anyone trying to buy a gun. (Applause.) So right now, Democrats and Republicans in the Senate are working on a bill that would ban anyone from selling a gun to somebody legally prohibited from owning one. That’s common sense. There’s no reason we can’t get that done. That is not a liberal idea or a conservative idea; it’s not a Democratic or Republican idea — that is a smart idea. We want to keep those guns out of hands of folks who shouldn’t have them.

Senators from both parties have also come together and proposed a bill that would crack down on people who buy guns only to turn them around and sell them to criminals. It’s a bill that would keep more guns off the street and out of the hands of people with the intent of doing harm. (Applause.)

And, by the way, in addition to reducing violence on the streets, it would also make life a lot easier and a lot safer for the people standing behind me here today. (Applause.)

We shouldn’t stop there. We should restore the ban on military-style assault weapons and a 10-round limit for magazines. (Applause.) And that deserves a vote in Congress — because weapons of war have no place on our streets, or in our schools, or threatening our law enforcement officers. Our law enforcement officers should never be out-gunned on the streets. (Applause.)

But we also know that if we’re going to solve the problem of gun violence, then we’ve got to look at root causes as well. That means we should make it easier for young people to get access to mental health treatment. (Applause.) We should help communities like this one keep more cops on the beat. (Applause.) And since Congress hasn’t confirmed a director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms in six years, they should confirm your U.S. Attorney from Minnesota, Todd Jones, who is here today and who I’ve nominated for this post. (Applause.)

These are common-sense measures supported by Democrats, Republicans and independents, and many of them are responsible gun owners. And we’re seeing members of Congress from both parties put aside their differences and work together to make many of them a reality.

But if there’s one thing that I’ve learned over the last four years, it’s that you can’t count on anything in Washington until it’s done. And nothing is done yet. There’s been a lot of talk, a lot of conversation, a lot of publicity, but we haven’t actually taken concrete steps yet.

Last week, the Senate held its first hearing since Newtown on the need to address gun violence and the best way to move forward, and the first people to offer testimony were Gabby Giffords and her husband, Mark Kelly. They talked about how a complex problem like this has no single solution, but if we still had a 10-round limit on magazines, for example, the gunman who shot Gabby may never have been able to inflict 33 gunshot wounds in 15 seconds. Fifteen seconds, 33 rounds fired. Some of the six people who lost their lives that day in Tucson might still be with us.

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Now, changing the status quo is never easy. This will be no exception. The only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the American people decide it’s important. If you decide it’s important. If parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, hunters and sportsmen, Americans of every background stand up and say this time it’s got to be different — we’ve suffered too much pain to stand by and do nothing.

And by the way, it’s really important for us to engage with folks who don’t agree with us on everything, because we hope that we can find some areas where we do agree. And we have to recognize that there are going to be regional differences and geographic differences. The experience that people have of guns in an urban neighborhood may not be the same as in a rural community.

But we know, for example, from polling that universal background checks are universally supported just about, by gun owners. The majority of gun owners, overwhelming majority of gun owners think that’s a good idea. So if we’ve got lobbyists in Washington claiming to speak for gun owners saying something different, we need to go to the source and reach out to people directly. We can’t allow those filters to get in the way of common sense.

That’s why I need everybody who’s listening to keep the pressure on your member of Congress to do the right thing. Ask them if they support common-sense reforms like requiring universal background checks, or restoring the ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines. Tell them there’s no legislation to eliminate all guns; there’s no legislation being proposed to subvert the Second Amendment. Tell them specifically what we’re talking about — things that the majority of Americans, when they’re asked, support.

And tell them now is the time for action. That we’re not going to wait until the next Newtown or the next Aurora. We’re not going to wait until after we lose more innocent Americans on street corners all across the country. We’re not going to wait until somebody else’s father or son are murdered.

Some of the officers here today know what it’s like to look into the eyes of a parent or a grandparent, a brother or a sister who has just lost a loved one to an act of violence; to see the pain and the heartbreak from wondering why this precious life, this piece of your heart was in the wrong place at the wrong time. It changes you. You’re not the same afterwards.

And obviously whatever that experience is like is nothing compared to the experience that those families are actually going through. And it makes you realize that if there’s even one thing we can do to keep our children and our community safe, if there’s just one step we can take to prevent more families from feeling what they feel after they’ve lost a loved one, we’ve got an obligation to take that step. We’ve got an obligation to give our police officers and our communities the tools they need to make some of the same progress that’s been made here in Minneapolis.

There won’t be perfect solutions. We’re not going to save every life. But we can make a difference. And that’s our responsibility as Americans. And that’s what I’ll do every single day as long I’ve got the honor of serving as your President.

So thank you. God bless you. God bless these United States of America. (Applause.) Thank you. (Applause.)

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U.S. President Barack Obama

To reduce gun violence…

Resource-Officer-2

At the heart of the President’s proposals to reduce gun violence is a focus on making sure students and teachers are safe. Through executive actions, President Obama will:

Provide incentives for schools to hire school resource officers…

Develop model emergency response plans for schools, houses of worship, and institutions of higher education…

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The President needs all the support he can get to get this done and to get it done adequately.  I hope the NRA leaders are willing to at least support and even vocalize this part of Obama’s proposals!  Meanwhile citizens must pressure the U.S. congress…

~ Rawclyde!

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Resource officers coming…

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Press Release

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The National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO) recently applauded President Obama’s call for more resource officers in the nation’s schools.

According to documents released January 16 by the White House, the administration will give preference to applicants for COPS Hiring Grants who plan to use the grants to hire specially trained SROs (school resource officers).

In addition, the White House proposed a new Comprehensive School Safety program, which would give $150 million to school districts and law enforcement agencies to hire SROs, school psychologists, social workers, and counselors.

Quotes from Mo Canady, executive director, NASRO, Hoover, Alabama:

“The President’s proposals demonstrate that his administration fully understands the training and role of specially trained, carefully selected school resource officers. The White House proposals are right on target in this regard.”

“We’re happy that the President’s proposal does not mention armed guards. Instead, it refers only to specially trained school resource officers. There’s been a lot of confusion about armed guards recently and NASRO agrees that SROs are the only armed persons who should work on school campuses. To arm others, especially educators or volunteers, could be a recipe for disaster.”

“The president is absolutely correct to advocate for a comprehensive emergency management plan for every school. NASRO has helped schools develop such plans for years. We’re ready and eager to help the administration create model plans for schools.”

Background:

School-based police officers (also known as school resource officers) are specially trained, carefully selected, full-time law enforcement officers who work in schools as their primary assignments.

SROs are much more than armed guards. They develop relationships with students and staff and participate in the education of students.

SROs enhance, rather than detract from the learning environment. Students learn that the officers are their friends, not someone to fear.

NASRO is dedicated to providing the highest quality of training to school-based law enforcement officers in order to promote safer schools and safer kids.

SRO2

Obama Gun Fighter Speech

(full transcript)

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INTRODUCTION BY VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN:

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Before, before I begin today, let me say to the families of the innocents who were murdered 33 days ago, our heart ~ our heart goes out to you. And you show incredible courage ~ incredible courage being here. And the president and I are going to do everything in our power to honor the memory of your children and your wives with ~ with the work we take up here today.
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It’s been 33 days since the nation’s heart was broken by the horrific, senseless violence that took place at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Twenty ~ twenty beautiful first-graders gunned down in a place that’s supposed to be their second sanctuary.  And six members of the staff killed, trying to save those children. It’s literally been hard for the nation to comprehend, hard for the nation to fathom.
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And I know for the families who are here, time is not measured in days, but it’s measured in minutes, in seconds since you received that news ~ another minute without your daughter, another minute without your son, another minute without your wife, another minute without your mom.
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I want to personally thank Chris and Lynn McDonnell who lost their beautiful daughter, Grace, and the other parents who I had a chance to speak to, for ~ for their suggestions and for, again, just for their ~ the courage of all of you to be here today. I admire ~ I admire the grace and the resolve you all are showing.
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And I must say, I’ve been deeply affected by your faith as well, and the president and I are going to do everything to try to match the resolve you’ve demonstrated. No one can know for certain if this senseless act could have been prevented, but we all know we have a moral obligation ~ a moral obligation to do everything in our power to diminish the prospect that something like this could happen again.
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As the president knows, I’ve worked in this field a long time in the United States Senate, having chaired a committee that had jurisdiction over these issues of guns and crime, and having drafted the first gun violence legislation ~ the last gun violence legislation, I should say. And I have no illusions about what we’re up against ~ what we’re up against or how hard the task is in front of us. But I also have never seen the nation’s conscience so shaken by what happened at Sandy Hook.
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The world has changed and it is demanding action. It’s in this context that the president asked me to put together, along with cabinet members, a set of recommendations about how we should proceed to meet that moral obligation we have. And toward that end, the cabinet members and I sat down with 229 groups ~ not just individuals ~ representing groups, 229 groups, from law enforcement agencies to public health officials to gun officials to gun advocacy groups to ~ to sportsmen and hunters and religious leaders. And I’ve spoken with members of Congress on both sides of the aisle, had extensive conversations with mayors and governors and county officials.
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And the recommendations we provided to the president on Monday call for executive actions he could sign, legislation he could call for, and long-term research that should be undertaken. They’re based on the emerging consensus we heard from all the groups with whom we spoke, including some of you who are victims of this god-awful occurrence, ways to keep guns out of the wrong hands, as well as ways to take comprehensive action to prevent violence in the first place.
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We should do as much as we can as quickly as we can, and we cannot let the perfect be the enemy of the good. Some of what you will hear from the president will happen immediately. Some will take some time. But we have begun and we are starting here today and we’re resolved to continue this fight.
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During the meetings that we held, we met with a young man who’s here today. I think Colin Goddard is here. Where are you, Colin? Colin was one of the survivors of the Virginia Tech massacre. He was in the classroom. He calls himself one of the lucky seven. And he’ll tell you, he was shot four times on that day, and he has three bullets that are still inside him.
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And when I asked Colin about what he thought we should be doing, he said that ~ he said, “I’m not here because of what happened to me. I’m here because of what happened to me keeps happening to other people, and we have to do something about it.” Colin, we will. Colin, I promise you, we will. This is our intention. We must do what we can now. And there’s no person who is more committed to acting on this moral obligation we have than the President of the United States of America.
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Ladies and gentlemen, President Barack Obama.
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(APPLAUSE)
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PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA:
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Thank you everybody. Please ~ please have a seat. Good afternoon, everybody.
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Let me begin by thanking our vice president, Joe Biden, for your dedication, Joe, to this issue, for bringing so many different voices to the table, because while reducing gun violence is a complicated challenge, protecting our children from harm shouldn’t be a divisive one.
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Now, over the month since the tragedy in Newtown, we’ve heard from so many. And obviously, none have affected us more than the families of those gorgeous children and their teachers and guardians who were lost. And so we’re grateful to all of you for taking the time to be here and recognizing that we honor their memories in part by doing everything we can to prevent this from happening again.
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But we also heard from some unexpected people, in particular I started getting a lot of letters from kids. Four of them are here today, Grant Fritz, Julia Stokes , Hinna Zeha, and Teja Goode. They’re pretty representative of some of the messages I got. These are some pretty smart letters from some pretty smart young people. Hinna, a third-grader ~ you can go ahead and wave Hinna ~ that’s you. Hinna wrote, “I feel terrible for the parents who lost their children. I love my country, and I want everybody to be happy and safe.”
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And then Grant ~ go ahead and wave Grant ~ Grant said, “I think there should be some changes. We should learn from what happened at Sandy Hook. I feel really bad.” And then Julia said ~ Julia, where are you? There you go. “I’m not scared for my safety. I’m scared for others. I have four brothers and sisters ~ and I know I would not be able to bear the thought of losing any of them.” And these are our kids. This is what they’re thinking about.
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And so what we should be thinking about, is our responsibility to care for them, and shield them from harm, and give them the tools they need to grow up, and do everything that they’re capable of doing. Not just to pursue their own dreams, but to help build this country. This is our first task as a society, keeping our children safe. This is how we will be judged. And their voices should compel us to change.
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And that’s why last month, I asked Joe to lead an effort, along with members of my cabinet, to come up with some concrete steps we can take right now to keep our children safe, to help prevent mass shootings, to reduce the broader epidemic of gun violence in this country… Continue reading