And It’s Here To Stay

Dual at Diablo

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On March 23, 2010, I sat down at a table in the East Room of the White House and signed my name on a law that said, once and for all, that health care would no longer be a privilege for a few. It would be a right for everyone.

Five years later, after more than 50 votes in Congress to repeal or weaken this law and multiple challenges before the Supreme Court, here is what we know today:

This law worked. It’s still working. It has changed and saved American lives. It has set this country on a smarter, stronger course.

And it’s here to stay…

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This morning (June 25, 2015), the Supreme Court upheld one of the most critical parts of health reform — the part that has made it easier for Americans to afford health insurance, no matter where you live.

If the challenges to this law had succeeded, millions would have had thousands of dollars in tax credits taken away. Insurance would have once again become unaffordable for many Americans. Many would have even become uninsured again. Ultimately, everyone’s premiums could have gone up.

Because of this law, and because of today’s decision, millions of Americans will continue to receive the tax credits that have given about 8 in 10 people who buy insurance on the new Health Insurance Marketplaces the choice of a health care plan that costs less than $100 a month.

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If you’re a parent, you can keep your kids on your plan until they turn 26 — something that has covered millions of young people so far. That’s because of this law. If you’re a senior, or have a disability, this law gives you discounts on your prescriptions — something that has saved 9 million Americans an average of $1,600 so far. If you’re a woman, you can’t be charged more than anybody else — even if you’ve had cancer, or your husband had heart disease, or just because you’re a woman. Your insurer has to offer free preventive services like mammograms. They can’t place annual or lifetime caps on your care.

And when it comes to preexisting conditions — someday, our grand kids will ask us if there was really a time when America discriminated against people who got sick. Because that’s something this law has ended for good.

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Five years in and more than 16 million insured Americans later, this is no longer just about a law. This isn’t just about the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare…

Today is a victory for every American whose life will continue to become more secure because of this law. And 20, 30, 50 years from now, most Americans may not know what “Obamacare” is. And that’s okay. That’s the point.

Because today, this reform remains what it always has been — a set of fairer rules and tougher protections that have made health care in America more affordable, more attainable, and more about you.

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That’s who we are as Americans. We look out for one another. We take care of each other. We root for one another’s success. We strive to do better, to be better, than the generation before us, and we try to build something better for the generation that comes behind us.

And today, with this behind us, let’s come together and keep building something better. That starts right now.

Thank you,

President Barack Obama

June 25, 2015

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editor

Rawclyde!

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Our Loyalties Must Transcend Our Race

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by Sp4 Clyde Collins

U.S. Army 1980-1984

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     Before Pvt. 2 Donald Duty joined the U.S. Army he was a school bus driver for a “voluntary ethnic transfer program” in a big city on the mainland.

     In this public funded program, minority kids were bused out of the ghetto to schools in the more well-to-do neighborhoods, but only if their parents thought it best to do so.  It was part of a larger desegregation plan.

     On one particular day, before it was a holiday, the late Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday, Jan. 15, Duty picked up his predominantly Black junior high school kids in the ghetto, headed for the plush hills of suburbia.

     Now it cannot be said for sure that the bus was haunted, but it was an old bus.  And believe it or don’t, as the bus bumped along, the ghost of Martin Luther King Jr. whispered to the school bus driver, “Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class and our nation.”

     “What?” said Duty.  He glanced over his shoulder at one of his sleepy passengers.  “Did you say something?”

     The little Black girl’s eyes went round.  “No!  You’re crazy!”

     “Hmmm,” groaned Duty as he drove past rickety wino dens and battled with a cement-mixer truck for an on-ramp to the freeway.

     Soon enough the school bus loaded with little equalities rattled along the freeway past a local U.S. Army post.  Again the ghost of a Black preacher named King whispered to the driver, a little louder this time:  “No individual can live alone; no nation can live alone, and as long as we try, the more we are going to have war in this world.”

     Duty grew more pallid than he already was.  He glanced over his other shoulder at a tough Black kid glaring back at him.  “You talking to me?” said Duty, his voice a quiver.

     The kid threw his arms up into the air.  “Why I be talkin’ to YOU…  You’re scary!”

     Duty shrugged.

     The school bus chugged ~ down an off-ramp and up into the trimmed, pruned splendor of suburbia.

     And the ghost of the man who had studied the nonviolence of Gandhi and the civil disobedience of Thoreau, baritoned:  “Adapting nonviolent resistance to conditions in the United States, we swept into Southern streets to demand our citizenship and manhood.  If they let us march, they admitted their lie that the Black man was content.  If they shot us down, they told the world they were inhuman brutes.”

     Duty accidently ground the gears as his bus jerked up a long hill.

     The ghost of the man who had been jailed 29 times for what he believed in, continued to say, “The nation and the world were sickened and through national legislation wiped out a thousand Southern laws, ripping gaping holes in the edifice of segregation.”

     At the top of the hill where a panoramic view of the city could be enjoyed on an occasional clear day, a group of about 20 people stood with quart-size cans of motor oil in their hands.  Two cars were parked sideways, blocking the street.  Duty knew these people intended to stop his school bus and pour the cans of oil over his passengers’ heads.  He knew it because these people were wearing white hoods.  He stepped on the brake and idled the engine half a block away.

     “We’re gonna have to go the long way,” moaned Duty.

     “But we’ll be late for class,” moaned a passenger.

     Duty winced ~ and he looked up at the overhead mirror.  He saw the now totally awake expressions upon his passengers’ faces.  They were peering back at him expectantly, watching, wondering what he was going to do now!

     Then for a long moment Duty stared through red-rimmed eyes at the crowd up the street.  He slipped the bus into gear, gunned the accelerator and let out the clutch.

     In no time at all the school bus was roaring in fourth gear directly at the blockade.  As the bus sped forward, the ghost of he who was assassinated by a sniper’s bullet outside a hotel in Memphis, Tenn., April 4, 1968, had one last thing to say to the all-of-a-sudden unrelenting Caucasian at the wheel:  “Now the judgement of God is upon us, and we must either learn to live together as brothers or we are all going to perish as fools.”

     A couple of years later Duty and a Black soldier were sitting outside the company barracks at TAMC one evening.  They were exchanging tales.  When Duty finished this particular story the other soldier exclaimed, “Then what happened?”

     Duty’s soul expanded like a blooming flower above the city lights and below the twinkling stars.  With a smug little smile he said, “We got to school on time.”

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photo:

1960 western

“The Trial of Sergeant Rutledge”

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Duty World

http://dutypoeticslab.yolasite.com

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Gun Law in Colorado

by Steve Lipsher / The Denver Post

August 6, 2013 (still valid today)

Today's musket ~ NRA style

(Today’s) recall elections of Colorado Senate President John Morse and state Sen. Angela Giron — both Democrats — stand as a twisted version of “democracy at the barrel of a gun.”

Proponents of the recall petitions are angry that Morse and Giron supported measures in the past legislative session that — heaven forbid — require every gun purchase to go through a background check and limit the number of bullets that pre-loaded magazines can hold.

Most of the sane world sees those as common-sense steps intended to keep guns out of the hands of criminals and lunatics and prevent them from creating the kind of unspeakable carnage that we’ve already seen in Colorado at Columbine High School and the Century Aurora theater.

Polls consistently indicate that more than 80 percent of the population supports universal background checks and at least 60 percent supports the limit on ammunition magazines.

But backers of the recall insist that Morse and Giron “ignored” their constituents — namely, themselves — and they want their heads on pikes as a warning to others who would dare infringe on what they perceive to be their sacred, inviolable Second Amendment rights.

Recall proponents singled out Morse because he is the high-profile leader of the Senate and considered vulnerable, having won re-election in 2010 by a scant 340 votes in an electorally split Colorado Springs district.

Giron, who wasn’t even a particularly outspoken supporter of the gun bills, is being recalled because … well, apparently because the gun-activist front organization Basic Freedom Defense Fund could pay for enough petition signatures to meet the lower total-vote threshold in her district and get her hauled back to the ballot.

Meanwhile, they failed to gain enough support to recall two other Democrats, Sen. Mike McLachlan, D-Durango, and Sen. Evie Hudak, D-Westminster. (Never mind that dozens of other legislators also voted in favor of the bills, and Gov. John Hickenlooper signed them into law.)

That lawmakers would face recalls over this single issue — reasonable checks on who has access to guns — would be considered ridiculous in any other society.

But in a bloodthirsty country where the National Rifle Association keeps members of Congress completely petrified and incapable of passing even the most tepid gun restrictions despite our embarrassing off-the-chart murder rate, this effort stands as reasonable political discourse.

Similar unfounded credibility is given to the effort by a few dozen malcontents and cranks in northeastern Colorado who want to break away and form a new state, also in a pique over those “goldarned lawmakers in Denver takin’ away our Second Amendment rights,” among other things.

Of course, few of those who believe that the new gun laws trample on the Bill of Rights actually are part of any “well-regulated militia” spelled out — but routinely ignored by gun proponents — in the actual text of the Second Amendment.

No one is taking their guns. No one is creating a gun registry long rumored by fear-mongers. No one is even telling them they can’t accumulate more firepower than several small countries or doomsday religious sects.

The state is telling them, however, that if they’re on a murderous rampage, they’re going to have to reload after 15 shots, not 100.

That doesn’t sound unreasonable.

Backed by the NRA and the equally absolutist Rocky Mountain Gun Owners, the recall is intended only to intimidate lawmakers and hold them at the barrel’s end of their virtual guns.

It was without a hint of irony that original recall proponent Tim Knight of Durango told The Gazette in Colorado Springs about his motivation in the effort: “Democracy is being held hostage.”

Here’s hoping that the recalls both fail, serving as a punch to the bullies’ noses and giving notice that lawmakers may stand up to the gun nuts with the backing of the vast majority of us who are sick of innocent people dying in Littleton and Tucson and Sandy Hook and Aurora.

Steve Lipsher (slipsher@comcast.net) of Silverthorne writes a monthly column for The Denver Post.

For Colorado From Arizona!

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sami

Secret Agent Whapp

backs politicians Morse and Giron

in the Colorado recall elections

9/10/2012

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Gun 2013

the short novel

http://gun2013.yolasite.com/title-page.php

A free read from Rawclyde!

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NRA Court Jesters

hr_giger_illuminatus_I

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The National Rifle Association (NRA) leaders, as vocalized by Wayne La Pierre (its spokesman) & Ted Nugent (a board member), seem to believe NRA members lack enough durability and intellect to obtain a gun license, and to register and insure their guns ~ and thus obtain partnership with their democracy and government.

The NRA leadership is alienating their members from the rest of the national population via paranoia, conspiracy hoaxes, and a dumb logic so full of loopholes that it resembes taxes for the rich in the United States of America.  The mass murder of children in an elementary school by an over-armed citizen in 2012 seems to have generated such reaction instead of an attempt to work & compromise with the rest of the nation in order to narrow the possibility of such evil to occur again.  Instead, the NRA leadership’s knowledge & ownership of deadly hardware seems to have gone to its head.  Consequently, all that they inspire is a goon-ish & blatant backpedal into Civil War consciousness.  These NRA leaders seem to want to generate targets for their well-armed members ~ so that they have something very serious to take pot-shots at ~ like U.S. drones, attack helicopters, warthog planes, F-14 fighter jets, and other armed vehicles, not to mention American soldiers & policemen.

The NRA leaders’ most viable role in American society & politics, around the corner, if not already, is as their membership’s & the gun industry’s court jesters. 

If I was an NRA member, I’d campaign for & elect some real leaders…

Rawclyde!

http://gun2013.yolasite.com/title-page.php

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http://www.meetthenra.org

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